Washington Center

Winter Quarter 2018

International Policy

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Day and Time: 
Tuesday, 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
January 9 to March 13, 2018
Semester Dates: 
January 9 to April 18, 2018
Campus: 
UCDC
Category: 
Core Seminar
Description: 

This seminar is designed to help you to engage critically and think systematically about crucial questions of international and global affairs. Through weekly news briefings, student research, and course readings, we will engage with a wide range of issues and problems that are international or global, while identifying and trying to understand the behavior of major actors in the international political arena of the 21st century. This is a research seminar, but the approach is applied, civic, and polemical, rather than academic and theoretical. Over the course of term, each student will conduct research and complete several written, visual, and oral assignments on a contemporary political or policy problem of their choice that is global in scope.

 

Draft Syllabus

*Required for all semester students enrolled in the Congress, Supreme Court, International Development, International Policy and Media seminars:  

The last four weeks of this semester (March 21 to April 18) will be spent in a special topics module taught by Professor Jennifer Diascro on Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m. This module will account for 15% of the core seminar final course grade. See syllabus below (forthcoming). Please contact Dr. Diascro at jennifer.diascro@ucdc.edu with questions. 

Dr. Danielson will officially be your instructor of record for the term, responsible for computing and submitting final course grades at the end of the term.

**NO additional registration required.

Course ID: 
UCDC191E01W18

The U.S. Supreme Court

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Day and Time: 
Thursday, 6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
January 11 to March 15, 2018
Semester Dates: 
January 11 to April 18, 2018
Campus: 
UCDC
Category: 
Core Seminar
Description: 

Gay marriage. The death penalty. Abortion. Health care. Cell phone privacy. The U.S. Supreme Court has heard cases on all of these topics in recent years, and its decisions ultimately touch the lives of all Americans. In this class we will study the Supreme Court's place in the U.S. legal system. Topics we will cover include: how a case gets to the court, the justices, the role of lawyers before the court, the purpose of oral argument, the court building and its symbolism, and media coverage of the court. At least once during the semester students will attend an oral argument, and cases currently before the court will be used as a reference point for class discussion. This class is geared not only toward anyone who is interested in the law or government service but also toward anyone interested in working on or being informed about the biggest issues of the day.

Draft Syllabus

 

*Required for all semester students enrolled in the Congress, Supreme Court, International Policy, International Development and Media seminars:  

The last four weeks of this semester (March 21 to April 18) will be spent in a special topics module taught by Professor Jennifer Diascro on Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m. This module will account for 15% of the core seminar final course grade. Syllabus forthcoming. Please contact Dr. Diascro at jennifer.diascro@ucdc.edu with questions. 

Professor Gresko will officially be your instructor of record for the term, responsible for computing and submitting final course grades at the end of the term.

**NO additional registration required.

Course ID: 
UCDC191I01W18

*NEW* Partisanship and Polarization in American Politics (2-Unit Elective)

Credits: 
2
Instructor: 
Term or Semester: 
Day and Time: 
Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
January 9 to March 13, 2018
Campus: 
UCDC
Course Number: 
UC Santa Cruz Sponsored: Sociology 113C
Category: 
Special
Description: 

American politics and voters are currently at the highest stage of polarization since the Civil War.  As a result of the heightened state of the partisan divide, conflict between -- as well as within -- the branches of our government, including within the political parties themselves, has resulted in near gridlock on all but the most urgent of legislative issues.  Meanwhile, the resolution of many policies on which there is broad public consensus -- from gun policy to entitlement reform to campaign finance reform to comprehensive immigration policy – remains seemingly gridlocked.  Not surprisingly, public confidence in our political leaders and our political institutions remains at historically low levels.

The class will explore a multiplicity of explanations behind the emergence of our current divided society: the ramifications of civil rights movement and resulting changes in Southern politics; the rise of a newly competitive, conservative movement of the 1970s and 1980s; changes in the press, media and other forms of mass communications, including social media; the inadvertent results of efforts to reform political system including campaign finance, among other issues. And the class will explore credible steps we might take to restore a greater sense of comity, community and collaboration to our national politics.

Draft Syllabus

Course ID: 
UCDC15003W18

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