Washington Center

Winter Quarter 2018

General Research

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Day and Time: 
Wednesdays, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
January 10 to March 14, 2018
Semester Dates: 
January 10 to April 18, 2018
Campus: 
UCDC
Category: 
Core Seminar
Description: 

Research methods in the social sciences are a set of tools that assist us in understanding our world. This seminar is designed to teach you how to be a critical observer of and contributor to that world using these methods. The course has an academic and a practical or civic component. As scholars, we are interested in contributing to a body of knowledge based on the systematic examination of our surroundings; we ask questions, develop theories, collect data to subject to various forms of analysis, and submit results in written form for critique by experts in our field and ultimately for publication in our discipline’s scholarly journals. As practitioners and citizens, we are interested in devising solutions to the world’s problems; we ask questions, examine relevant bodies of knowledge, develop arguments and communicate them to stakeholders to effect change. We will spend the term being both scholars and practitioners/citizens, using your internship experiences, DC, and the larger national and global community, to explore questions and answers through each of these lenses with the tools that improve our lives.

 

Draft Syllabus

Course ID: 
UCDC191A01W18

Law and Society

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Term or Semester: 
Day and Time: 
Thursdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
January 11 to March 15, 2018
Campus: 
UCDC
Course Number: 
UCLA Sponsored: Sociology 169
Category: 
Quarter Elective
Description: 

In this course, we will examine the relationship between the rules that govern us (law) and how we organize ourselves into communities (society), with the ultimate goal of understanding how American democracy works (or doesn’t work) to meet the needs of the people.  In addition to exploring how law reflects our values, traditions, and rights, we will focus on the role of legal institutions (largely judicial, but also legislative) in resolving conflicts among competing values, traditions, and rights that define our society.  And we will examine how individuals and groups work among those institutions to achieve preferred policy outcomes. 

Draft Syllabus 

Course ID: 
UCDC15202W18

Human Rights in Theory and Practice

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Term or Semester: 
Day and Time: 
Thursday, 6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
January 11 to March 15, 2018
Campus: 
UCDC
Course Number: 
UCLA Sponsored: Political Science 139
Category: 
Quarter Elective
Description: 

The course examines the philosophical and historical foundations of the international human rights regime, and probes debates over universality, culture, and human rights. The course also includes an introduction to the United Nations and regional systems for the protection and promotion of human rights, including tools for analyzing forms of interventions that purport to promote peace and justice. Key issues addressed will include state sovereignty and its limits, refugee law, counter-terrorism and civil liberties on the home front, and truth commissions and transitional justice, among others. In particular, we will examine the utility of human rights treaties, regimes, organizations and advocacy coalitions for assessing accountability, promoting reconciliation, and protecting the abused and endangered.

The course will challenge students to draw upon specific cases to broaden their understandings of what constitutes a right, an abuse, and a protection. We will explore contemporary and historical cases, and students will have an opportunity to study a particular case of a human rights violation, including an examination of the deep and proximate causes, ways that the violations might have been avoided, and pathways toward alleviation, reconciliation, and justice.

Draft Syllabus

Course ID: 
UCDC15002W18

Money, Message and Media

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Term or Semester: 
Day and Time: 
Thursday, 7:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
January 11 to March 15, 2018
Campus: 
UCDC
Course Number: 
UCLA Sponsored: Political Science 141E
Category: 
Quarter Elective
Description: 

This course will look at all aspects of national campaigns, from the evolution of political parties and advertising, to the messages of potential 2016 candidates, the impact of social media and role of outside interest groups.  The class will provide historical context in order to put current events into perspective, as well as lead lively classroom discussions and debates on the state of America’s political system.

Draft Syllabus

Course ID: 
UCDC15901W18

Race and Ethnic Politics in a Post-Obama Presidency

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Term or Semester: 
Day and Time: 
Tuesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
January 9 to March 13, 2018
Campus: 
UCDC
Course Number: 
UCLA Sponsored: Political Science 186
Category: 
Quarter Elective
Description: 

This course will examine the fundamental theories of race and representation as it applies to the lived experiences and quest for freedom, justice, and equality on part of African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, Native Americans and other groups. Given the racial and ethnic demographic shifts over the past two decades, particular attention will focus on race, representation, and racial discrimination from President Obama to President Trump. Moreover, the election of the first black president has transformed the political landscape in ways that have challenged traditional notions of descriptive and substantive representation, while also bringing to the forefront of political science discourse a serious engagement of race and representation scholarship. Finally, the Trump administration has brought to the forefront the ways in which identity politics and white nationalism operate within the context of political inclusion and racial representation. This course will provide an analysis of the public policy and sociopolitical impact of both presidents as it relates to the racial and ethnic demographic shifts in the American polity.

Draft Syllabus

Course ID: 
UCDC15501W18

Politics of Water Policy

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Term or Semester: 
Day and Time: 
Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
January 9 to March 13, 2018
Campus: 
UCDC
Course Number: 
UCLA Sponsored: Political Science 146E
Category: 
Quarter Elective
Description: 

As the title suggests, this course is about one of the trenchant policy problems of our time, policy regarding the availability, uses, and distribution of water, particularly in arid parts of the world.  Though the focus of the class will be the American West (west of the 100th meridian), I will bring into discussion—and invite discussion—about water policy dynamics in other parts of the world, such as Africa and Australia, where there exists conflict or potential for conflict over riparian rights. This class will take 3 different cuts at water policy, organized around the frames of politics (including and especially the role of interest groups), organization, and technology.  We will learn about the history and logic behind the major policies in place for most of the past hundred years, what incentives were created under those policies, and how various interests with stakes in maintaining or changing aspects of water policy constrain or create openings for change.  We will spend some time discussing some of the more significant actors involved in water policy, such as the Bureau of Reclamation and the US Army Corps of Engineers, organizational actors that have shaped our current world.  And no class on water policy would be complete without a discussion of the technological possibilities for helping us navigate our way out of crisis, through new methods of conservation, water desalinization, waste water recycling, etc.  What is the potential for technology in this domain?

 

Draft Syllabus

Course ID: 
UCDC15001W18

Washington Focus

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Term or Semester: 
Day and Time: 
Thursday, 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
January 11 to March 15, 2018
Campus: 
UCDC
Category: 
Core Seminar
Description: 

Our nation’s capital is a center of governance and politics but also of historical sites, research institutes, arts and cultural institutions, and diverse communities. In this seminar you will become acquainted with Washington DC – its beauty and problems, its inspirations and dissentions. Each week, our class will explore one aspect of the city. Working sometimes in teams, as individuals, or as a class, we will both learn about and visit: various neighborhoods, the city’s history (National Building Museum), memorials on the National Mall, research centers, selected museum exhibits, public buildings such as the Capitol, selected art exhibits, and more. Some of these assignments may connect directly to your internships. Appropriate readings will be assigned to prepare you for your visits, and you will also be required to keep abreast of “news of the day” in Washington. During the term you will write short weekly papers connecting various reading assignments with your site visits and complete a journal of your explorations of the city.

 

This course is only approved for: UCI, UCR, UCSB, UCD and UCSC.

There is no waitlist for this class, so if you would like to enroll and the class is full, please email Professor Sandalow (msandalow@ucdc.edu).

 

Draft Syllabus

Course ID: 
UCDC191M01W18

Congress and Politics in Washington

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Day and Time: 
Tuesdays, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
January 9 to March 13, 2018
Semester Dates: 
January 9 to April 18, 2018
Campus: 
UCDC
Category: 
Core Seminar
Description: 

This course will focus on the design and operation of the U.S. Congress and its relationship with the Executive Branch.  Students will also gain insights into how legislators spend their time in Washington and in their constituencies. A key feature of the class will involve the analysis of legislative behavior and executive action on contemporary policy and political issues. Other topics include the committee system and lawmaking, presidential powers, House and Senate rules/procedures, political parties, the budget process and campaign finance, and the origins of partisanship and polarization. There will also be a focus on past efforts at reforming the institution of Congress, and discussion of options for improving the functions of, and public regard for, the Congress. Students should be prepared to actively participate in class discussions.

Draft Syllabus

 

*Required for all semester students enrolled in the Congress, Supreme Court, International Development, International Policy and Media seminars:  

The last four weeks of this semester (March 21 to April 18) will be spent in a special topics module taught by Professor Jennifer Diascro on Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m. This module will account for 15% of the core seminar final course grade. See syllabus below (forthcoming). Please contact Dr. Diascro at jennifer.diascro@ucdc.edu with questions. 

Dr. Lawrence will officially be your instructor of record for the term, responsible for computing and submitting final course grades at the end of the term.

**NO additional registration required.

Course ID: 
UCDC191B01W18

Washington Media

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Day and Time: 
Wednesday, 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
January 10 to March 14, 2018
Semester Dates: 
January 10 to April 18, 2018
Campus: 
UCDC
Category: 
Core Seminar
Description: 

This seminar will examine the relationship between politics, governance and the media, in all its new finery. By wedding practice with theory, the course provides an academic framework for students interning in government, news media and advocacy offices. The course complements and enhances the lessons absorbed during Washington, D.C. internships, combining reading, writing, discussion, guest speakers, field trips and scholarly research. Students will examine the evolving methods of political communication. This spans the media environment, from conventional journalism and specialty beat reporting to lobbying and governmental public relations. Students will confront the ethical and professional dilemmas that arise daily in the nation’s news capital. These include defining the boundary between personal privacy and public responsibility, developing expertise without going native and managing stories amid the collapse of print journalism and the rise of mobile new technologies. Washington, D.C. serves as the expanded classroom for this hands-on course. Field trips to the National Press Club, Capitol Hill and the Newseum will insert students into the heart of the action. Guest presentations by reporters, press secretaries, lobbyists and lawmakers will bring students face-to-face with key practitioners. Through readings and discussions, the class will be agile and responsive to the political moment. Students will complete a significant writing assignment, which will be aimed for potential publication. Students will also sharpen their writing and oral presentation skills with shorter assignments and ungraded practice.

 

There is no waitlist for this class, so if you would like to enroll and the class is full, please email Professor Sandalow (msandalow@ucdc.edu).

Draft Syllabus

 

*Required for all semester students enrolled in the Congress, Supreme Court, Presidency, International Policy and Media seminars: 

The last four weeks of this semester (March 21 to April 18) will be spent in a special topics module taught by Professor Jennifer Diascro on Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m. This module will account for 15% of the core seminar final course grade. See syllabus below (forthcoming). Please contact Dr. Diascro at jennifer.diascro@ucdc.edu with questions.

Professor Sandalow will officially be your instructor of record for the term, responsible for computing and submitting final course grades at the end of the term.

 

**NO additional registration required.

Course ID: 
UCDC191F01W18

International Development

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Day and Time: 
Tuesday, 6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
January 9 to March 13, 2018
Semester Dates: 
January 9 to April 18, 2018
Campus: 
UCDC
Category: 
Core Seminar
Description: 

This is an introductory course to the international development field. The focus is on some of the key questions, challenges and achievements in this field. Materials from the course (readings, documentaries, discussions of current events) will enhance your understanding of the dominant approaches to poverty alleviation, the role of inter/national development actors, organizations and institutions, the promises of post-2015 Development Goals including the empowerment of women and youth. You will be exposed to the theoretical foundations of the field and will be required to make sense of these by following current events and drawing on your internship experiences in the nation’s Capital as well as your interactions with various experts, policy makers and development practitioners. The ultimate goal of the course is to enhance your understanding of the various causes and consequences of development problems and encourage you to develop individual perspective on effective strategies for change.

Draft Syllabus

*Required for all semester students enrolled in the Congress, Supreme Court, International Development, International Policy and Media seminars:  

The last four weeks of this semester (August 30 to September 20) will be spent in a special topics module taught by Professor Jennifer Diascro on Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m. This module will account for 15% of the core seminar final course grade. See syllabus below (forthcoming). Please contact Dr. Diascro at jennifer.diascro@ucdc.edu with questions. 

Professor Skalli-Hanna will officially be your instructor of record for the term, responsible for computing and submitting final course grades at the end of the term.

**NO additional registration required.

Course ID: 
UCDC191E03W18

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