Washington Center

Fall Quarter 2017

General Research

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Day and Time: 
Wednesdays, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
September 27 to December 6, 2017
Semester Dates: 
August 30 to December 6, 2017
Campus: 
UCDC
Category: 
Core Seminar
Description: 

Research methods in the social sciences are a set of tools that assist us in understanding our world. This seminar is designed to teach you how to be a critical observer of and contributor to that world using these methods. The course has an academic and a practical or civic component. As scholars, we are interested in contributing to a body of knowledge based on the systematic examination of our surroundings; we ask questions, develop theories, collect data to subject to various forms of analysis, and submit results in written form for critique by experts in our field and ultimately for publication in our discipline’s scholarly journals. As practitioners and citizens, we are interested in devising solutions to the world’s problems; we ask questions, examine relevant bodies of knowledge, develop arguments and communicate them to stakeholders to effect change. We will spend the term being both scholars and practitioners/citizens, using your internship experiences, DC, and the larger national and global community, to explore questions and answers through each of these lenses with the tools that improve our lives.

 

Draft Syllabus

Course ID: 
UCDC191A01F17

International Policy

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Day and Time: 
Tuesday, 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
September 26 - December 5, 2017
Semester Dates: 
August 29 - December 5, 2017
Campus: 
UCDC
Category: 
Core Seminar
Description: 

This course is designed to help you think systematically about international and global policy issues, and will guide you in writing a substantive research paper based on a topic of your choice. The course seeks to consider contemporary events and policy questions with reference to the recent history of world politics and foundational theories of comparative and international politics. Through news briefings, student research, and course readings, we will engage with a wide range of issues and problems that are of international and global scale, while identifying and trying to understand the behavior of major actors in the international political arena of the 21st century. Within this framework, we will also reflect on continuities and changes to the international system and the possible future trajectories of world (dis)order.

Draft Syllabus

 

*Required for all semester students enrolled in the Congress, Supreme Court, Presidency, International Policy and Media seminars:  

The first four weeks of this semester (August 30 to September 20) will be spent in a special topics module taught by Professor Jennifer Diascro on Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m. This module will account for 15% of the core seminar final course grade. See syllabus below (forthcoming). Please contact Dr. Diascro at jennifer.diascro@ucdc.edu with questions. 

Dr. Danielson will begin teaching the International Policy seminar on Tuesdays, beginning September 26, and he will officially be your instructor of record for the term, responsible for computing and submitting final course grades at the end of the term.

**NO additional registration required.

Course ID: 
UCDC191E01F17

The American Presidency and Executive Power

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Day and Time: 
Tuesday, 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
September 26 to December 5, 2017
Semester Dates: 
August 29 to December 5, 2017
Campus: 
UCDC
Category: 
Core Seminar
Description: 

This course will put the current presidency in historical and theoretical context, drawing on a variety of readings and approaches. At its core, this class is about the problem of executive power in democratic government. We will study and reflect not only on the details of what the presidency is in theory and practice, we will also consider how it (and other parts of the system) might be changed to overcome the problems of governance that have plagued the U.S. The goal is to understand the work of the presidency and some of the different perspectives by which we might analyze presidents and their administrations.

Draft Syllabus

 

*Required for all semester students enrolled in the Congress, Supreme Court, Presidency, International Policy and Media seminars:  

The first four weeks of this semester (August 30 to September 20) will be spent in a special topics module taught by Professor Jennifer Diascro on Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m. This module will account for 15% of the core seminar final course grade. See syllabus below (forthcoming). Please contact Dr. Diascro at jennifer.diascro@ucdc.edu with questions. 

Dr. Nunez will begin teaching the Presidency seminar on Tuesdays, beginning September 26, and he will officially be your instructor of record for the term, responsible for computing and submitting final course grades at the end of the term.

**NO additional registration required.

Course ID: 
UCDC191C01F17

Anthropology of War

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Term or Semester: 
Day and Time: 
Tuesday, 6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
September 26 to December 5, 2017
Campus: 
UCDC
Course Number: 
UCI Sponsored: Anthropology 169
Category: 
Quarter Elective
Description: 

This course will engage in social, anthropological and historical works to look at ways in which visual and textual medias both produce a culture of war and are produced by war.  Starting with the notion of war as a “primitive ritual,” this class will trace the idea of ritual in warfare and in cultures produced by war from “primitive warfare” through the cold war and post-cold wars to look at shifts in notions of ritual and “the primitive” from “dirty” to “clean” wars, while observing shifts in technology that produced a new discourse of war.  And of course the aftermath of war in terms of migration and dispacement.  This course will look at wars thematically rather than chronologically in order to better understand the ways in which most wars from primitive to post-modern constructed, projected and consumed the image of an enemy; used human sacrifice and martyrdom to protect a bound community; “treated” returning soldiers; mourned and memorialized post-war and, finally, how the remains of war come to produce peace time culture.    

 

Syllabus

Course ID: 
UCDC15201F17

Youth, Social Media and Development

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Term or Semester: 
Day and Time: 
Tuesday, 6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
September 26 to December 5, 2017
Campus: 
UCDC
Course Number: 
UCLA Sponsored: Anthropology 139
Category: 
Quarter Elective
Description: 

Digital technologies and online social networks play an increasingly important role in the political, social and economic development of all societies. In the Global North and South, it is largely the young generation of men and women (30 years old and under) who experiment with and embrace these technologies in creative, innovative and unanticipated ways. This course focuses on the creative energies of youth and the enabling powers of digital/ networked technologies to solve some of the enduring development challenges. We will explore how a) youth’s access to information technologies help reduce poverty, inequality and deprivation;  b) youth benefit from and use digital technologies to develop marketable skills, create and sustain income-generating activities and end cycles of unemployment; and how technologies can/do empower young citizens to end corruption, denounce human rights violations and contribute to ending gender-based violence. These will be among the key questions that students will be encouraged to think about, examine and reflect on critically while discussing both the contributions and limitations of digital technologies in the field of youth and international development.

Draft Syllabus

 

Course ID: 
UCDC15701F17

Money, Message & Media

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Term or Semester: 
Day and Time: 
Thursday, 7:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
September 28 to December 7, 2017
Campus: 
UCDC
Course Number: 
UCLA Sponsored: Political Science 141E
Category: 
Quarter Elective
Description: 

This course will look at all aspects of national campaigns, from the evolution of political parties and advertising, to the messages of potential 2016 candidates, the impact of social media and role of outside interest groups.  The class will provide historical context in order to put current events into perspective, as well as lead lively classroom discussions and debates on the state of America’s political system.

 

Draft Syllabus

Course ID: 
UCDC15001F17

U.S. Foreign Policy

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Term or Semester: 
Day and Time: 
Thursday, 6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
September 28 to December 7, 2017
Campus: 
UCDC
Course Number: 
UCLA Sponsored: Political Science 120B
Category: 
Quarter Elective
Description: 

This course examines contemporary issues in U.S. foreign policy, focusing primarily on a series of regional case studies including the Persian Gulf (Iran and Iraq); the Middle East and North Africa; U.S. and Japan, the Koreas & East Asia; Transatlantic Relations; and the U.S. in Central Asia (Afghanistan/Pakistan). Although the course is organized on a regional basis, we will explore a number of recurring themes including: nuclear proliferation; the problems of weak and failing states; relations with China and Russia; terrorism and counterterrorism; resource competition; the importance of culture and national identity; and the economics of national security.

 

Syllabus

Course ID: 
UCDC15101F17

Washington Focus

Instructor: 
Term or Semester: 
Day and Time: 
Thursday, 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
September 28 to December 7, 2017
Campus: 
UCDC
Category: 
Core Seminar
Description: 

Our nation’s capital is a center of governance and politics but also of historical sites, research institutes, arts and cultural institutions, and diverse communities. In this seminar you will become acquainted with Washington DC – its beauty and problems, its inspirations and dissentions. Each week, our class will explore one aspect of the city. Working sometimes in teams, as individuals, or as a class, we will both learn about and visit: various neighborhoods, the city’s history (National Building Museum), memorials on the National Mall, research centers, selected museum exhibits, public buildings such as the Capitol, selected art exhibits, and more. Some of these assignments may connect directly to your internships. Appropriate readings will be assigned to prepare you for your visits, and you will also be required to keep abreast of “news of the day” in Washington. During the term you will write short weekly papers connecting various reading assignments with your site visits and complete a journal of your explorations of the city. 

This course is only approved for: UCI, UCR, UCSB, UCD and UCSC.

There is no waitlist for this class, so if you would like to enroll and the class is full, please email Professor Sandalow (msandalow@ucdc.edu).

Draft Syllabus

Course ID: 
UCDC191M01F17

Washington Media

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Day and Time: 
Wednesday, 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
September 27 to December 6, 2017
Semester Dates: 
August 30 to December 6, 2017
Campus: 
UCDC
Category: 
Core Seminar
Description: 

This seminar will examine the relationship between politics, governance and the media, in all its new finery. By wedding practice with theory, the course provides an academic framework for students interning in government, news media and advocacy offices. The course complements and enhances the lessons absorbed during Washington, D.C. internships, combining reading, writing, discussion, guest speakers, field trips and scholarly research. Students will examine the evolving methods of political communication. This spans the media environment, from conventional journalism and specialty beat reporting to lobbying and governmental public relations. Students will confront the ethical and professional dilemmas that arise daily in the nation’s news capital. These include defining the boundary between personal privacy and public responsibility, developing expertise without going native and managing stories amid the collapse of print journalism and the rise of mobile new technologies. Washington, D.C. serves as the expanded classroom for this hands-on course. Field trips to the National Press Club, Capitol Hill and the Newseum will insert students into the heart of the action. Guest presentations by reporters, press secretaries, lobbyists and lawmakers will bring students face-to-face with key practitioners. Through readings and discussions, the class will be agile and responsive to the political moment. Students will complete a significant writing assignment, which will be aimed for potential publication. Students will also sharpen their writing and oral presentation skills with shorter assignments and ungraded practice.

There is no waitlist for this class, so if you would like to enroll and the class is full, please email Professor Sandalow (msandalow@ucdc.edu).

Draft Syllabus

 

*Required for all semester students enrolled in the Congress, Supreme Court, Presidency, International Policy and Media seminars:  

The first four weeks of this semester (August 30 to September 20) will be spent in a special topics module taught by Professor Jennifer Diascro on Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m. This module will account for 15% of the core seminar final course grade. See syllabus below (forthcoming). Please contact Dr. Diascro at jennifer.diascro@ucdc.edu with questions. 

Professor Sandalow will begin teaching the Media seminar on Wednesdays, beginning September 27, and he will officially be your instructor of record for the term, responsible for computing and submitting final course grades at the end of the term.

**NO additional registration required.

Course ID: 
UCDC191F01F17

The U.S. Supreme Court

Credits: 
4
Instructor: 
Day and Time: 
Thursday, 6:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Quarter Dates: 
September 28 to December 7, 2017
Semester Dates: 
August 31 to December 7, 2017
Campus: 
UCDC
Category: 
Core Seminar
Description: 

Gay marriage. The death penalty. Abortion. Health care. Cell phone privacy. The U.S. Supreme Court has heard cases on all of these topics in recent years, and its decisions ultimately touch the lives of all Americans. In this class we will study the Supreme Court's place in the U.S. legal system. Topics we will cover include: how a case gets to the court, the justices, the role of lawyers before the court, the purpose of oral argument, the court building and its symbolism, and media coverage of the court. At least once during the semester students will attend an oral argument, and cases currently before the court will be used as a reference point for class discussion. This class is geared not only toward anyone who is interested in the law or government service but also toward anyone interested in working on or being informed about the biggest issues of the day.

Draft Syllabus

 

*Required for all semester students enrolled in the Congress, Supreme Court, Presidency, International Policy and Media seminars:  

The first four weeks of this semester (August 30 to September 20) will be spent in a special topics module taught by Professor Jennifer Diascro on Wednesdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m. This module will account for 15% of the core seminar final course grade. See syllabus below. Please contact Dr. Diascro at jennifer.diascro@ucdc.edu with questions. 

Professor Gresko will begin teaching the Supreme Court seminar on Thursdays, beginning September 28, and she will officially be your instructor of record for the term, responsible for computing and submitting final course grades at the end of the term.

**NO additional registration required.

Course ID: 
UCDC191I01F17

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